MJD

Diary
Excerpts :


Soldiers

Italy

North Africa

Old Army songs

Roll call

Quotes and sayings

Medals

Photos

Afterwards

Links

Dad's brother -
Thomas (Bertie)
Donoghue
1911 - 1944


Home page

Mail



Pat Donoghue,
Canada,
©1997


OLD ARMY SONGS

MJD singing
Mario Lanza II  (Dad loved the opera)

SOLDIERS SONG 1914-1918.
Where are the lads of the village tonight?
Where are the lads we know?
They're not in Piccadilly or Leicester Square!
No my boy, no not there.
They've taken a trip to the continent
With their rifles and their bayonets bright.
Facing danger gladly,
Where they're needed badly,
That's where they are tonight.

FRED KARNOS ARMY.
We are Fred Karnos Army
A sorry lot are we,
We cannot march, we cannot fight,
What fucking good are we?
And when we get to Berlin
The Kaiser he will shout,
"Mein Gott, Mein Gott
What a fucking fine lot
Are the British Arm-y!"

MADAMEMOISELLE.
Mademoiselle she bought a cow
Parley-voo
To milk the brute she didn't know how
Parley-voo
She pulled the tail instead of the tit
And covered herself all over with - milk?
Inky pinky parley voo.

1914-1918 MARCHING SONG.
The bells of hell go ting-a-ling-a-ling
For you but not for me.
The angels they sing ting-a-ling-a-ling
They hold the goods for me.
O death where is thy sting-a-ling-a-ling
O grave thy victory?
The bells of hell go ting-a-ling-a-ling
For you but not for me.


And here is one that I added.
I can still hear my Father singing this in Italian .........

Underneath the lantern by the barrack gate
Darling I remember the way you used to wait,
'Twas there that you whispered tenderly
That you loved me, you'd always be
My Lilli of the lamplight,
My own Lilli Marlene.

Time would come for roll call, time for us to part
Darling I'd caress you and press you to my heart
And there 'neath that far off lantern light,
I'd hold you tight, we'd kiss "good-night,"
My Lilli of the lamplight,
My own Lilli Marlene

Orders came for sailing somewhere over there,
All confined to barracks was more than I could bear;
I knew you were waiting in the street,
I heard your feet, But could not meet,
My Lilli of the lamplight,
My own Lilli Marlene.

Resting in a billet just behind the line,
Even tho'we're parted your lips are close to mine;
You wait where that lantern softly gleams,
Your sweet face seems to haunt my dreams,
My Lilli of the lamplight,
My own Lilli Marlene.