Wild flowers and shrubs

If we could see the miracle of a single flower clearly, our whole life would change ... Buddha

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On my wanderings across the province in search of fish I have walked past many wild flowers without fully appreciating their beauty. It was not until I came across a Painted Trillium that I realised what I had been missing. It has added yet another dimension to my passion for fly-fishing.

It is quite possible that I have mis-identified the odd flower. I have found that, like fly-pattern books and local lore, the many books I have read on the subject do not always agree on the common names given to certain flowers.

An important criteria in identifying a flower is the shape of the leaf, something I had been ignoring in my original research.

These are the flowers that I have found on my wanderings. Some have been by the side of the trail, or on an unused railroad track, or in my backyard, and some I found while I was beating my way through the bushes due to the windfalls from Hurricane Juan (which is when I found the Trillium).

Pictures marked with an asterisk * have been contributed by Bob Boudreau, whose passion for fishing and nature is infectious.

An interesting note to fishermen is that the leaves and stems of the Jewelweed Touch-me-not can be crushed and applied to a poison-ivy sting for short-term relief. Perhaps Albert of The Tent Dwellers wouldn't have wasted the whisky if he'd known this small fact.

This page would not have been possible without the help of Peter Landry and his wonderful web site entitled Wild Flowers of Nova Scotia. Peter's site contains a full description of most of the following flowers.
And another great site is Nova Scotia Wilds. It is full of information, not only about flowers but also the animals of Nova Scotia.

I would very much appreciate comments and corrections.
The Wild Bunch

Poppies in a field of corn
Daisies growing in a lawn

Buttercups of brightest yellow
Scented clover in the meadow

Bluebells in a leafy glade
Violets peeping from the shade

Heather on the mountain side
Snowdrop hangs her head to hide

Dog roses entwined with hedge
Stone crop on a cragie ledge

Daffodils and cowslips too
Primroses to name a few

Forget me nots? I hope I never!
May these wild ones survive forever.

by Eva Cecilia Lefever




References:
Roland's Flora of Nova Scotia
The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Wildflowers - Eastern Region
A Field Guide to Wildflowers by Peterson and McKenny
Wild Flowers of Canada by Adrian Davies
The Wild Flower Book, East of the Rockies by Donald and Lillian Stokes

  White flowers

Arbutus, trailing,
white (mayflower)

Aster, white,
flat-topped

Aster,
Whorled, Wood

Bakeapple
(white, 5 petals,
solitary flowers)

Bedstraw,
Northern
 

Blackberry (Raspberry)


Blueberry


Bunchberry


Burnet, Canadian
 
 


Bur-reed


Campion

Chamomile,
Scentless
 
 
 


Chickweed


Chokeberry


Chokeberry, Red


Cleavers

Cucumber,
Wild

Cucumber,
Wild


Daisy


Dogwood


Elderberry
 
 
 


Fleabane


Harestail


Hobblebush


Indian Pipe


Labrador tea


Leatherleaf

Lily of the valley,
Wild


Lily, Water


Lion's-foot

Meadow Rue,
Tall
 
 

Moccasin flower*
(White lady's slipper)

Musk Mallow
(White or pink)

Nodding
Ladies' Tresses

Orchis,
Leafy White*
 
 


Partridgeberry

Pearly
everlasting


Pipewort


Pussy willow
 
 

Queen Anne's
Lace

Queen of the
meadow


Rose, Multiflora


Sarsparilla, Wild


Silver-rod
 

Smartweed,
Pale

Speedwell,
Thyme-leaved

Starflower
(usually 7 petals)

Strawberry
Wild
 
 

Teaberry;
Wintergreen


Thistle, Canadian

Trillium, Painted
(do not pick)
 
 
 


Turtlehead

Viburnum,
Maple leaved

Violet,
Sweet White*


Winterberry


Yarrow
 
  Yellow flowers

Butter and
Eggs*


Buttercup


Cats-ear


Cinquefoil, Dwarf

Cinquefoil,
Rough-fruited
 


Clover, yellow


Coltsfoot

Cress,
Winter

Goatsbeard,
yellow

Goatsbeard,
yellow
 


Goldenrod

Goldenrod,
Seaside


Honeysuckle


Iris, Yellow flag
 
 


Kingdevil


Lily, Bluebead


Lily, Bluebead

Lily, Pond
Yellow


Lily, Trout*
 

Loosestrife,
Garden

Loosestrife
(Swamp candles)


Lupin


Marsh marigold


Marsh marigold
 


Mullein, Common


Muskflower


Muskflower

Mustard
Wild

Primrose,
Evening

Rattlebox,
Yellow

Sorrel, Wood,
Yellow

St. Johnswort,
Common

Tansy,
Common

Trefoil,
Birdsfoot

Wintercress,
Common
 
  Red - pink - orange flowers

Arbutus, trailing,
pink (mayflower)


Bouncing Bet

Calopogon,
Grass-pink
 
 
 


Cranberry


Devils Paintbrush

Gerardia,
Slender
 
 
 


Herb Robert

Honeysuckle,
Trumpet


Joe Pye Weed

Lady's Slipper,
Pink*


Lady's Thumb


Lily, Wood


Live forever


Meadowsweet


Mint, Wild


Musk Mallow
(pink)

Pitcher plant,
Northern


Pitcher


Pogonia, Rose


Rhodora


Rose, Pasture


Rose, Rugosa
 


Sedge


Searocket

Sheep laurel
(Lambkill)

Sorrel, Wood,
Common

Spreading
Dogbane
 
 


Steeplebush

St. Johnswort,
Marsh
 
 
 
 

Sumac,
Staghorn

Touch-me-not
(Jewelweed)


Twinflower

Vetch,
Crown

Yarrow,
pink
 
  Blue - purple flowers

Aster,
New England


Bindweed

Bittersweet
(Nightshade)
 
 
 


Bluets


Blue-eyed grass


Clover, purple
 
 
 

Columbine
(escapee)


Columbine


Eyebright


Fireweed


Forget-me-not*


Fringed
Willowherb


Harebell*


Healall


Indian Tobacco


Iris, Blue Flag*
 
 


Ivy, Ground

Knapweed,
Brown



Lettuce,
Tall Blue


Lobelia, Water


Lupin

Orchid,
Purple fringed


Dame's Rocket


Pickerel weed


Sea Heather

Skullcap Marsh/
Common
 


Spearmint
Wild


Speedwell

Speedwell,
Corn

Speedwell, germander
(Bird's-eye)

Thistle,
Bull

Touch me not,
Indian
 

Vervain,
Blue*

Vetch
Tufted

Violet,
common blue


Viper's Bugloss*
 
 


Woundwort


Woundwort
 
 
 
 
  Unknown
    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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